My Irish Heritage…

My Irish heritage comes by way of my paternal grandparents – O’Quinn and Kennedy, and of course my daddy. The O’Quinn name is one of the oldest Irish surnames. It was Anglicized from the Gaelic O’Cuinn. Which means descendant of Conn of the Hundred Battles. It’s pretty cool to be able to say I descend from Irish Kings and Warriors.

conns half of ireland.2

5Great-Grandparents:
Alexander Bryant O’Quinn was born in 1705 in County Clare, Ireland. He died in 1736 in Bertie County North Carolina. He married Patience Carter, daughter of Moore Carter.

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4Great-Grandparents:
Bryant O’Quinn was born about 1725 in Halifax County North Carolina. He died in 1765 in Sampson County North Carolina. Bryant married Ellet Turbevil in 1753 in Halifax County North Carolina. Ellet was born in 1732 in Bertie County North Carolina. She died in 1764 in Halifax County North Carolina. Ellet is the daughter of Walter Turbevil and Mary Elizabeth Shackleford.

"I would see what is above"

“I would see what is above”

3Great-Grandparents:
John O’Quin was born 13 June 1754 in Halifax County North Carolina. He died 6 January 1836 in Muscogee County Georgia. John married Rhoda Horton on 7 October 1790 in Kershaw County South Carolina. Rhoda was born 3 April 1767 in North Carolina and died 3 March 1852 in Muscogee County Georgia. Rhoda is the daughter of Daniel Horton and Mary Ezelle. John is a Revolutionary War veteran. He fought in the Battle of Stono Georgia. After the war he lived another maybe twelve years in North Carolina. John and Rhoda stayed about twenty years in Kershaw County South Carolina then migrated to Washington County Georgia by 1820. John and Rhoda had nine children. John and Rhoda are buried at their old home place in Muscogee County; what is now Cemetery 40 on Fort Benning Georgia. In 1976 the Army held a special ceremony, as part of the Bicentennial celebrations, to mark the graves.

JohnO'Quin.Military

John

Rhoda

2Great-Grandparents:
John O’Quinn II was born 21 March 1795 in Kershaw County South Carolina. He died in September 1870 in Angelina County Texas. John married Candace Leaptrot about 1824 in Washington County Georgia. Candace is the daughter of Aquilla Leaptrot and Milbra Pearce. John and Candace both are buried in Walker Cemetery in Angelina County Texas. John served in the War of 1812 and during the Creek Indian Wars. John and Candace appear to have had sixteen children.

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Great-Grandparents:
Brittain Balding O’Quinn was born 21 April 1835 in Washington County Georgia. He died 7 July 1906 in Angelina County Texas. Brit married Trecie Ann Hood on 8 July 1858 in Angelina County. Trecie Ann is the daughter of Wiley Hood and Sarah Stanley. Brit and Trecie are both buried in Gann Cemetery at the O’Quinn Baptist Church in Angelina County. Brit served in the Civil War. He did receive a Civil War pension. And after his death Trecie applied for and was granted a Civil War widow’s pension. Brit and Trecie had at least eight children. Family lore tells us the given name Brittain was in honor of Great Brittain.

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Grandparents:
Sidney Edward O’Quinn was born 8 December 1880 in Angelina County Texas. He died 8 May 1932 In Angelina County Texas. Sidney married Minnie Viola Kennedy on 12 May 1901 in Angelina County Texas. Viola was born 6 February 1883 in Angelina County Texas. She died 24 July 1957 in Angelina County Texas. Viola is the daughter of William Kennedy and Mahalia Riley. Sidney and Viola are both buried in Gann Cemetery at the O’Quinn Baptist Church in Angelina County Texas. Sidney and Viola had six children.

Minnie Viola Kennedy O'Quinn with daughter Eddie Faye

Minnie Viola Kennedy O’Quinn with daughter Eddie Faye

Parents:
Ottis Brittain O’Quinn was born 27 September 1913 in Angelina County Texas. He died 25 February 1979 in Wichita County Kansas. My daddy was always called Blackie. He is buried in Gann Cemetery at the O’Quinn Baptist Church in Angelina County Texas. Blackie married Wilma Wetta Latham on 20 July 1946 in Shelby County Texas. Wilma was born 10 March 1923 in Shelby County Texas. She died 19 April 2001 in Nacogdoches County Texas. She is buried in Duncan Cemetery in Shelby County Texas. The spelling of both her given and middle names is taken from numerous official documents. Wilma is the daughter of William Pearl Latham and Annie Elizabeth Lane Brittain. Blackie and Wilma had two children, me and a much older brother. After they divorced Wilma remarried and had three more boys. Blackie never remarried. Although family lore tells us he was married for a short time before marrying Wilma. Still no official record of this found.

my daddy Ottis Brittain O'Quinn

my daddy Ottis Brittain O’Quinn

Posted in O'Quinn

First Thanksgiving Connection…

James Chilton was born in 1562 in Kent, England. He died 8 December 1620 on the Mayflower, which was by then anchored off Provincetown Harbor. James married Susanna Furner in 1584 in Kent. Susanna was born 5 November 1573 in Kent. She died 21 January 1621 in Plymouth. James Chilton, his wife, and their youngest daughter Mary came on the Mayflower in 1620.  James was probably the oldest passenger, age 64.

 Mary Chilton was born 31 May 1607 in Kent, England. She died 11 May 1669 in Boston, Massachusetts. Mary married John B. Winslow on 12 October 1624 in Plymouth. John was born 16 April 1597 in Worcestershire, England to Edward Winslow and Magdelene Oliver. He died 21 May 1674 in Boston, Massachusetts. John came over on the Fortune in 1621. Mary is said to be the first Pilgrim to step off the Mayflower onto Plymouth Rock.

"The Landing of the Pilgrims" painted by Henry Bacon in 1877 (this is on exhibit at the Pilgrim Hall Museum)

“The Landing of the Pilgrims” painted by Henry Bacon in 1877
(this is on exhibit at the Pilgrim Hall Museum)

Susanna Winslow was born about 1629 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. She died 14 November 1685 in East Bridgewater, Massachusetts. Susanna married Robert Latham in 1649 in Plymouth. Robert was born 10 November 1613 in Bridgewater to William Latham and Elizabeth Newman. He died 14 November 1685 in East Bridgewater. Robert was a Constable in Bridgewater by 1674.

 James Latham was born in 1659 in Plymouth. He died 6 February 1738 in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. James married Deliverance Alger on 10 April 1690 in East Bridgewater. Deliverance was born in 1669 in Bridgewater to Thomas Alger and Elizabeth Packard. She died 1 January 1749 in East Bridgewater.  

 Thomas Latham was born 30 July 1693 in Bridgewater. He died in 1769 in Beaufort County, North Carolina. Thomas married Deborah Harden on 19 March 1712 in Bridgewater. Deborah was born 29 July 1694 in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. She died on 5 September 1732 in Bridgewater. Thomas was a millwright.

 Cornelius Latham was born in 1720 in Prince William County, Virginia. He died in 1800 in Randolph County, North Carolina. Cornelius married Mary Horton. Mary was born in 1697 in Westmoreland County, Virginia. She died in 1737 in Virginia.

 John Latham I was born in 1748 in Prince William County, Virginia. He died in January 1818 in Randolph County, North Carolina. John married Susannah Henderson in 1770 in Hawkins County, Tennessee. Susannah was born 2 October 1744 in Green County, North Carolina. She died 10 September 1799 in Grainger County, Tennessee.

 John Latham II was born in 1762 in Beaufort County. North Carolina. He died in 1838 in Shelby County, Texas. John married Mary Susan Andrews in 1782 in North Carolina. Mary Susan was born in 1770 in North Carolina. She died about 1842 in Shelby County, Texas. John II owned and operated a ferry on the Sabine River.

 John Latham III was born in 1790 in Beaufort County, North Carolina. He died in 1855 in Shelby County, Texas. John married, 1st, Marquerita Rosalie Sims in 1807 in Natchitoches, Louisiana. Marquerita was born in 1791 in Ayish Bayou, Texas to Richard Sims and Maria de la Concepcion Perez. Marquerita died in 1842 in Shelby County, Texas. John III and Marquerita were the first Anglo settlers in Shelby County, Texas.

 Samuel Houston Latham was born in 1836 in Shelby County, Texas. He died 27 June 1862 in Corinth, Mississippi. Houston and his younger brother Stephen were both Civil War casualties. Houston married Rebecca Faye Payne in 1855 in Shelby County. Rebecca was born 13 October 1838 in Shelby County to John Clinton Payne and Nancy Elizabeth White. Rebecca died 17 May 1918 in Shelby County. She never remarried.

 William Alvin Latham was born 24 January 1858 in Shelby County, Texas. He died on 18 July 1918 in Shelby County. Alvin married Mary Josephine Holt in 1875 in Shelby County. Mary Josephine was born 2 July 1853 in Shelby County to Solomon T. Holt and Rhoda Ann Choate. Mary Josephine died 28 May 1934 in Shelby County.

William Alvin Latham

William Alvin Latham

Mary Josephine Holt

Mary Josephine Holt

William Pearl Latham was born 3 October 1890 in Shelby County. He died 22 December 1973 in Orange County, Texas. Pearl married, 1st, Annie Elizabeth Lane Brittain on 16 October 1910 in Shelby County. Annie was born on 6 August 1892 in Shelby County to Thomas Franklin Brittain and Sarah Addie Biggs. Annie died 1 May 1982 in Shelby County. Grandpa Pearl took great pride in trying to convince the women in the family to name their baby boys William.

Annie Elizabeth Lane Brittain - on her wedding day in wedding dress she made

Annie Elizabeth Lane Brittain – on her wedding day in wedding dress she made

Wylma Wetah Latham was born 10 March 1923 in Shelby County. She died 19 April 2001 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. Wylma married, 1st, Ottis Brittain (Blackie) O’Quinn on 20 July 1946 in Shelby County. Blackie was born 25 Sept 1913 in Angelina County, Texas to Sidney Edward O’Quinn and Minnie Viola Kennedy. Blackie died 25 February 1979 in Sedgwick County, Kansas.

 And finally me. Born and raised in Texas!

Posted in Latham

Sir Thomas de Beauchamp and Lady Katherine de Mortimer

Thomas de Beauchamp was born 14 February 1314 and died of the plague 13 November 1369. He is buried at Warwick Castle. Thomas is the son of Sir Guy de Beauchamp the 10th Earl of Warwick and Lady Alice de Toni.

Thomas de Beauchamp and Katherine de Mortimer

Thomas de Beauchamp and Katherine de Mortimer

 After a Papal dispensation was granted Sir Thomas married Lady Katherine de Mortimer. Katherine was about fourteen years old when she and Thomas married. Their marriage was a celebration of two powerful families uniting. They had five sons and ten daughters.

Katherine is the daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Baroness Joan de Geneville. Katherine died 4 August 1369.

Sir Thomas the 11th Earl of Warwick was one of the most powerful English military commanders in the 14th Century. His many titles (some earned, some inherited) and accomplishments include:

Military commander during the Hundred Years’ War;

Fought in all the French wars of King Edward III;

Hereditary Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire for life;

Knighted by the King and given seisin of his lands, though he was under age, 20 February 1328/1329;

Summoned for service against the Scots, 1333 and 1335;

Commissioned to negotiate a truce with Scotland, 4 May 1336, and for a final peace there, 24 July 1337, and to consider measures for the defense of the realm, 11 December 1336;

Captain of the Army against the Scots, 25 March 1337;

Warden of the March of Scotland in 1337;

Hereditary Chamberlain of the Exchequer;

Pantler at Coronations;

Marshal of England February 1343 – 1369;

One of two Marshals of the English Army at Crecy 1346 and Siege of Calais 1346-47;

Admiral of the Fleet from the mouth of Thames towards West by March 1352/3;

Constable of English Army in Gascony and commander of the Vanguard at victory over the French of Poitiers 1356;

Began the rebuilding of the Collegiate Church of Saint Mary, in Warwick, out of money received from the ransom of a French Archbishop;

Sir Thomas was also a founding member of the Most Noble Order of The Garter, in 1348. An English order of chivalry which is today Europe’s oldest national order of knighthood in continuous existence.

Sir Thomas de Beauchamp, founding member Order of The Garter

Sir Thomas de Beauchamp, founding member Order of The Garter

Posted in Uncategorized

Descendants of William Jacob Bundrum and Canzada Ann Sinyard

William Jacob Bundrum was born 28 October 1862 in Paulding County, Georgia. He died 26 February 1908 in Paulding County, Georgia. He married Canzada Ann Sinyard on 12 Dec 1886 in Paulding County, Georgia.

William Jacob, called Jake, is the son of James B. Bundrum (3 May 1826 – 25 March 1913) and Mary Butts (1837 – 30 October 1887). Canzada Ann is the daughter of Simpson Sinyard and Sarah Ann Whitlow. She was born about 1866 in Paulding County, Georgia. She died 26 April 1948 also in Paulding County.

Canzada Ann Sinyard Bundrum and three of her grandchildren; Nancy Pearl, James Calvin and Vera Canzada; children of John Edward Beavers and Nancy Sarah Ann Bundrum.

Canzada Ann Sinyard Bundrum and three of her grandchildren; Nancy Pearl, James Calvin and Vera Canzada; children of John Edward Beavers and Nancy Sarah Ann Bundrum.

Jake and Canzada Ann are both buried at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery in Paulding County, Georgia.

Both the Bundrum and Sinyard families had lived in Paulding County, Georgia since the 1830s. The families farmed for a living.

The children of Jake and Canzada Ann are:

   1. Nancy Sarah Ann Bundrum, b: 10 March 1888 in Paulding County, Georgia; d: 27   October 1973 in Carroll County, Georgia; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia; Aka Daisy; m: John Edward Beavers

Nancy Sarah Ann Bundrum Beavers

Nancy Sarah Ann Bundrum Beavers

   2. R.L. Bundrum, b: September 1890

   3. Minnie Bundrum, b: January 1892; d: 15 September 1949

   4. Vinnie Bundrum, b: 6 February 1893 in Paulding County, Georgia; d:1978; burial: Bethany Christian Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia; m: Thomas Watson Defreese, 23 July 1911 in Paulding County

Vinnie Bundrum Defreese

Vinnie Bundrum Defreese

   5. Algie Bundrum, b: 30 December 1895; d: 27 August 1896; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia

   6. L.Z. Bundrum, b: 25 September 1896; d: 25 February 1957 in Fulton County, Georgia; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia; Aka Doc; m; Leola Newman

   7. Mamie Bundrum, b: 12 January 1899; d: 8 February 1902; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia

   8. Willie Bundrum, b: 26 May 1905; d: 3 Jan 1959; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia

Willie Bundrum

Willie Bundrum

 

Posted in Bondurant/Bundrum | 1 Comment

Descendants of Simpson Sinyard and Sarah Ann Whitlow

Simpson Sinyard is the son of Henry C. Sinyard I (19 September 1801 – 3 December 1877) and Dicy Hulsey (6 April 1796 – 16 July 1833)

He married Sarah Ann Whitlow on 28 December 1858 in Paulding County, Georgia.

Sarah Ann Whitlow was born 28 November 1837 in Cobb County, Georgia or Paulding County Georgia, and died 9 January 1882 in Paulding County, Georgia. She is the daughter of William C. Whitlow and Peggy Wallace. Sarah Ann died while giving birth to their 12th child, also named Sarah Ann.

Children of Sarah Whitlow and Simpson Sinyard are:

1. Canzada Ann Sinyard, b: August 1866, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 26 April 1948, Paulding County, Georgia; m: William Jacob Bundrum

Canzada Ann Sinyard

Canzada Ann Sinyard

       
2. Laura Sinyard, b: 17 December 1859, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 24 February 1929

Laura Sinyard

Laura Sinyard

3. Beauregard Sinyard, b: 21 December 1860, Dallas, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 7 February 1910, Paulding County, Georgia; burial: Bethany Christian Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia; m: Georgia Ann Demerca Parsons

Georgia Ann Demerca Parsons and Beauregard Sinyard

Georgia Ann Demerca Parsons and Beauregard Sinyard

4. Bartow Sinyard, b: 4 December 1861, Paulding, Georgia; d: 14 September 1862

5. Alexander Sinyard, b: 1867, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 1946, Paulding County, Georgia; m: Lela Fuller

6. Posey Howell Sinyard, b: 24 March 1871, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 29 May 1953, Paulding County, Georgia; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia; m: Annie New

Hosey and Posey Sinyard

Hosey and Posey Sinyard

7. Hosey P. Sinyard, b: 8 July 1873, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 17 February 1939, Paulding County, Georgia; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia; m: Minnie Lee Pilgrim

8. Milley Sinyard, b: 13 September 1874, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 27 July 1957, Paulding County, Georgia; m: William Baker

9. Nancy Adaline Sinyard, b: 25 February 1878, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 1940; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia

Nancy Adeline Sinyard

Nancy Adeline Sinyard

10. John Henry Sinyard, b: 8 November 1880, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 31 October 1961, Fulton County, Georgia; m: Mary Lorine Pilgrim

11. Eldridge Sinyard, b: Abt. 1881, Paulding County, Georgia

12. Sarah Ann Sinyard, b: 9 January 1882, Paulding County, Georgia; d: 15 September 1936, Paulding County, Georgia; burial: Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Paulding County, Georgia

Sarah Ann Sinyard

Sarah Ann Sinyard

 

Posted in Bondurant/Bundrum | 1 Comment

Descendants of Adeline Eugenia Bundrum and Samuel Alonzo Wicks

Adeline Eugenia Bundrum– was born 16 June 1877 in Paulding County, Georgia. She died 22 February 1961. She married Samuel Alonzo Wicks 24 November 1895 in Haralson County, Georgia, son of Isaac Wix II and Melinda Cole. He was born 8 October 1875 in Georgia. He died 7 September 1941 in Jefferson County, Alabama.

Adeline Eugenia Bundrum

Adeline Eugenia Bundrum

Aunt Willie (Willie Olivia Wicks Entrekin) remembers Addie being slender, without an extra ounce of fat. And that she wore her mostly gray, salt and pepper, hair in a bun on the back of her head. Addie would visit the family for a week at a time during the summer. When she did visit she helped out with all the chores and housework.

Addie lived with her daughter and son-in-law Hethie and Johnny Praytor during the last two decades of her life. She helped to raise their two daughters.

Family lore states Addie was raised near Little River Canyon in DeKalb County Alabama.

Samuel was a happy, fun-loving man who liked to tease his sons. And as with most of the Wicks family he was not very tall.

Samuel and Addie are found on the 1900 Shelby Alabama Census, the 1910 Cullman Alabama Census and the 1920 Etowah Alabama Census.

Adeline Eugenia Bundrum and Samuel Alonzo Wicks

Adeline Eugenia Bundrum and Samuel Alonzo Wicks

Children of Adeline Eugenia Bundrum and Samuel Alonzo Wicks:

1. James William Wicks was born 22 August 1897 in Baldwin County, Alabama.  He died 16  June 1973 in Etowah County, Alabama. Bill married Ida Cassandra Smith, 5 December 1920 in Etowah County, Alabama. Cassie was born 13 August 1900 in St Clair County, Alabama and died 29 December 1960 in Blount County, Alabama. Cassie is the daughter of William John Smith and Mary Augusta Marker.

Ida Cassandra Smith and James William Wicks

Ida Cassandra Smith and James William Wicks

Bill and Cassie had ten children.

Bill attended Etowah High School through the 10th grade, participating in the Young Farmers Organization, and won prizes for his crops.

Bill was a PFC in the Army 20 July 1918 – 22 May 1919. He completed his Basic Training for duty in WWI, but the war ended before he was sent overseas.

After WWI, Bill worked for the Alabama Great Southern Railroad for a while. Later on he started farming, which he did for the remainder of his life.

Bill and Cassie are found on the 1930 Jefferson Alabama Census.

2. Mary Lou Ethel Wicks was born November 1898 in Cullman County, Alabama. She died 24 January 1962 in Etowah County, Alabama. Ethel married 1st Russell S. Saffels, born 10 May 1887, died 26 October 1918. Ethel married 2nd Earl Lee MacElroy

Ethel and Russell had three children.

Ethel and Earl Lee had seven children.

Ethel is found on the 1920 Etowah Alabama Census as a 21 year old widow, living with her parents.

3. Dessie Olivia Wicks was born 16 March 1901 in Cullman County, Alabama. Dessie married Israel Isaiah Brothers. Bay was born 22 November 1896 and died 26 January 1976.

Dessie was murdered by her husband 24 February 1937. The murder was witnessed by their son Winfred and possibly by the other children. Bay served time in prison for the murder.

4. Alonzo M. Wicks was born 19 December 1900 in Cullman County, Alabama. He died 29 June 1974 in Jefferson County, Alabama. Lonnie married Mary Jane Hicks.

5. Hiram Wesley Wicks was born 19 January 1903 in DeKalb County, Alabama. He died 25 December 1991. Hiram married Alice C. Cowart, born about 1908 and died 9 January 1994. Alice is the daughter of Stephen Arthur Cowart and Sophie Johnson.

Hiram Wesley Wicks and Alice C. Cowart

Hiram Wesley Wicks and Alice C. Cowart

Hiram and Alice had seven children.

6. Hester Wicks was born 27 March 1909 in Cullman County, Alabama. She died December 1986 in Cullman County, Alabama. Hethie married Johnny Praytor.

Hethie and Johnny had five children.

7. Isaac Charles Wicks was born about 1911 in Cullman County, Alabama. He died December 1982. Ike married Jessie Mae Heaton.

Isaac Charles Wicks

Isaac Charles Wicks

Ike was shot in the stomach by a policeman friend while the friend was demonstrating his “quick draw”. He was never quite well after that.

8. Bertha Wicks was born about 1914 in Cullman County, Alabama. She died before 1998. Bertha married Olen Peoples. Olen was born 9 April 1918 and died in May 1974.

Bertha and Olen had three children.

Bertha and Elsie are twins.

9. Elsie Wicks was born about 1914 in Cullman County, Alabama. Elsie married Floyd Cox.

Elsie and Floyd had two children.

Elsie and Bertha are twins

10. Ruth Wicks was born 15 October 1915 and died February 1994. Ruth married Darrell C. Tucker. Darrell was born about 1912. Darrell is the son of Earle C. Tucker and Margaret Unknown.

Ruth and Darrell had three children.

11. Samuel Patrick Wicks was born 17 March 1919 in Cullman County, Alabama. He died January 1981. Patrick married 1st Dorothy Mae Looney, born June 1919 and died 2 September 1951. Patrick married 2nd Lucille Bullard.

Patrick and Dorothy Mae had 5 children.

Samuel Patrick Wicks

Samuel Patrick Wicks

12. Edward Joseph Wicks was born 2 August 1922 in Jefferson County, Alabama. He died 13 June 2000 in Jefferson County. Edward married Velma Irene Bullock 11 September 1943. Velma was born 6 September 1922 in Jefferson County and died 16 September 2004.

Posted in Bondurant/Bundrum, Wicks | 1 Comment

I always tell my family we descend from strong pioneer stock…

It was impossible to realize how strong all our ancestors were until I started learning about Mary Ann Draper Ingles. Called Mollie. Loved and revered by everyone who hears her miraculous story. She made a difference. She left a mark.

Mollie is not a direct line ancestor. I haven’t yet determined exactly how she fits into my English line. I only know that the Ingles, Inglish, Inglis and English families of New River Virginia are all connected. So somewhere along the family tree Mollie is a distant aunt or cousin.

Mollie married William Ingles in 1750. Theirs was the first Anglo wedding west of the Alleghenies. Both their families had emigrated from Ireland and ended up in what became known as Draper’s Meadow (present day Montgomery County Virginia, home of Virginia Tech). By the time the French and Indian War began Mollie and William had two sons – Thomas and George. They were named for each of their Grandfathers, as was tradition.                       

The cabin William built them at Ingles Ferry. Windowless because Mollie felt safer this way.

The cabin William built them at Ingles Ferry. Windowless because Mollie felt safer this way.

On 8 July 1755 Shawnee Indians attacked Draper’s Meadow. The dead were a visitor on his way out west; Col Patton, a neighbor; Mollie’s widowed mother, Eleanor; and Mollie’s nephew, her brother John’s, baby – all were scalped. Captured were Mollie, her two sons and her sister-in-law Bettie.

William Ingles and John Draper were working in the fields when the Shawnee attacked. By the time they heard the screams and saw smoke from the burning buildings it was too late. They ran back to the homestead, but they were so outnumbered by the Shawnee and they were without any weapons. There was nothing they could do except hide to escape capture or death. By the time William and John were able to organize a group of men to fight the Indians and rescue Mollie and the others it was too late. The Indians and their prisoners were long gone. They never gave up trying to find them though.

All the captives were taken to the Shawnee Nation near present day Chillicothe Ohio. Some of the captives did not survive the month long journey. Mollie was strong though and determined to find a way to escape and get back home. She marked each day of the journey by making a knot in the rope belt she wore. She mapped the journey in her head.

Mollie felt from the beginning that she was treated better than the other prisoners. She was allowed to ride a horse, with her two babies, during the journey. She did what she could to keep the other captives calm. She used any available herbs to doctor their wounds and illnesses. The day after arriving at the Shawnee village all the adult prisoners except Mollie had to run the gauntlet. Mollie hoped all this meant she would get to keep her children with her.

Sadly, Mollie’s sons, Tommy and George, were almost immediately taken from her. They were given to Indians who had lost children of their own and taken to other villages. George was only 3 and Tommy only 4. Little George died soon after the separation.

At the Indian Village, Mollie made shirts and blankets for the Indians and French Traders/Trappers. Mollie was eventually taken even farther north to Big Bone Lick (present day Boone County Kentucky, just south of Cincinnati).At Big Bone Lick she was the first Anglo to make salt west of the Kanawha.                    

Mollie's journey: red line is the route west the captives made to the Shawnee nation; blue line is her long walk home after escaping.

Mollie’s journey: red line is the route west the captives made to the Shawnee nation; blue line is her long walk home after escaping.

 By late October Mollie escaped with an Old Dutch woman who had been captured during a raid in the Pennsylvania area. Mollie knew the only chance she had of rescuing her sons was to get home to William. They escaped the Indians without adequate clothing or supplies. Mollie’s plan was for them to follow the Ohio, Kanawha, and New Rivers eastward back to Virginia. She had a fierce determination to get back home. Twice, delirious from starvation the Old Dutch woman tried to kill and eat Mollie. Fearing for her safety Mollie put the New River between them for protection, but kept the Old Dutch woman in sight. After 43 days and seven to nine hundred miles Mollie arrived home. She was naked, skeletal and now with long white hair instead of red. She was only 23.

During the over four months of her captivity William and John made trips to Williamsburg trying stir up interest in launching a preemptive strike against the Shawnee villages in Ohio. They even sought help from the Cherokee Nation, who were on friendly terms with the Shawnee. By the first of December they were back home, unsuccessful. But to the amazing news that Mollie had managed to escape captivity and walk home.

Located in front of the Boone County Kentucky Library

Located in front of the Boone County Kentucky Library

Mollie was the first white woman in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky. She had made a trip into territory in which no white man or army had yet made. Under the most horrendous conditions imaginable. Because of her captivity and her long journey home Mollie was able to help the army chart this territory.

Mollie and William had 4 more children after her return. It took almost 13 years but William was eventually able to ransom Tommy. It was a difficult adjustment for Tommy. He was almost seventeen now. The Indian life and ways was all he knew. Years later Tommy’s own wife and children were captured in the very same manner that he and his mother and brother had been.

Mollie and William continued to contribute to the establishment of our great country. They made a difference, left a mark. In 1762 William purchased land on each side of the New River, secured the permits and began operating the Ingles Ferry. The ferry ran day and night and was quickly a most prosperous business. The Ingles Ferry became a well known point along the Great Wagon Road migration route. William was also a Colonel in the Revolutionary War. Thomas was close friends with Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. Two of their daughters married Generals in the Army.               

William died in Virginia in April 1782. Mollie lived to be 83. She died in February 1815 at Ingles Ferry, Montgomery County Virginia.        

Constructed with chimney stones from their home at Ingles Ferry.

Constructed with chimney stones from their home at Ingles Ferry.

Their son, Colonel John Ingles wrote of his mother’s capture, daring escape and journey home several years after her death. The story told to him by Mollie.

           

                                  

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Happy Birthday, Granny Juanita!

         These are pictures from Granny’s (Evelyn Juanita Wicks Battles) 70th Birthday Bash.

In a perfect world you would still be with us. And we’d all gather in to help celebrate your 90th birthday.  Just as we did for your 70th.

                                           

Instead, we miss you just as much today as we have for the last fourteen years. Well, maybe a little more this year. We already tell Baby Morgan about you. Show her all the pictures. When she is older and can understand she will hear even more stories. And she will never doubt for a second how much her great-grandmother would have loved her. Just like you loved us all.

                                                 Just like you loved her mommie.

Posted in Wicks

John Latham III and Marquerita Rosalie Sims married in 1807 in Natchitoches Louisiana…

John Latham III was born in 1790 in Beaufort County, North Carolina and died in 1855 in Shelby County Texas.  He is the son of John Latham II and Mary Susan Andrews.

Marquerita Rosalie Sims was born in 1791 in Ayish Bayou – what is now the San Augustine area – and died in 1842 in Shelby County, Texas.  She is the daughter of Richard Sims and Maria de la Concepcion Perez.

Their Children:

1. King Henry Latham was born in 1808 in Bayou Pierre, Louisiana and died 1 Dec 1880 in Panola County, Texas. He married Mary Ann Davis and they had at least fourteen children including at least one set of twins. Mary Ann, called Polly, was born circa 1811 in Tennessee and died after 1888 in Panola County.

2. Charles Ella Latham was born circa 1810 and died circa 1820 in Shelby County, Texas. This is a female child, John III and others make reference to her in legal documents; her given name is believed to be Candelaria – named for one of Marquerita’s sisters.

3. Margaret Valentina Latham was born 14 Feb 1817 in Shelby County, Texas. There is a possibility this is actually two girls, a set of twins.

4. Mary Elizabeth Latham was born 3 Jul 1819 in Shelby County, Texas and died 1 Apr 1896 in Comanche County, Texas.  She married Thomas Franklin Haley I and they had at least seven children. Thomas was born 3 Jan 1817 and died 1 Feb 1865.

5. Susan Latham was born in 1821 in Shelby County, Texas and died after 1880. She married William D. Brandon and they had at least nine children. William was born in 1811 in Tennessee and died in 1859 in Newton County, Texas.

6. John Latham IV was born in 1825 in Shelby County, Texas. He married Elizabeth Unknown. Elizabeth was born circa 1835. She and John were married by the 1850 Census which shows her age as 14.

7. James Latham was born in 1826 in Shelby County, Texas.

8. Thomas Latham was born in 1827 in Shelby County, Texas and died 18 Dec 1927 in Shelby County.

9. Mary Jane Latham was born 25 Apr 1827 in Shelby County, Texas and died 22 Nov 1859. She married Thomas Franklin Brittain I and they had at least eight children. This appears to be the first of numerous connections between the John Latham III family and the Elder William Martin Brittain family. Thomas was born 1 July 1816 in Surry County, North Carolina and died 22 Jun 1892 in Hamilton Community in Shelby County.  Thomas’ parents are Elder William Martin Brittain and Rosanna Wright.

10. Samuel Houston Latham, called Houston, was born in 1836 in Shelby County, Texas and died 27 June 1862 Corinth, Mississippi. He married Rebecca Faye Payne and they had three children. Rebecca, called Becky, was born 13 Oct 1838 in Shelby County and died 17 May 1918 in Shelby County. Rebecca never remarried. Her parents are John Clinton Payne and Nancy Elizabeth White.

11. Stephen Richard Latham was born in 1838 in Shelby County, Texas and died in June 1862 in Corinth ,Mississippi. He married Sarah Catherine Jones, called Sallie, and they had two children. Sallie was born in 1843 in Texas. I found their two children on the 1870 Shelby Texas Census with her parents, but no Sarah/Sallie. Sarah’s parents are Charles Stuart Jones and Mithena Jane Grubbs.

12. William Latham is said to have been born in Shelby County, Texas and died by the time he was ten years old.

*** 

2nd wife of John Latham III – Susan Unknown was born 22 May 1808 and died 14 Aug 1889 in Shelby County Texas.

Their Children:

1. Mildred Ann Latham was born 3 July 1844 in Texas and died 10 Jan 1914 in Shelby County Texas. She married James Allen Payne – younger brother of Rebecca Faye Payne – when she was 43. They may have had one child together. John III makes reference to Mildred Ann as his step-daughter in legal documents. James Allen was born 30 Jul 1848 in Shelby County and died 5 Oct 1930 in Shelby County. James’s parents are John Clinton Payne and Nancy Elizabeth White.

2. Katherine Gerome Latham was born in 1846 Shelby County, Texas and died 10 Sept 1910 in Shelby County. As an adult she was called Kittie, but as a child she was called Gerome. Census transcribers and even many family researches tended to assume she was a he! Kittie married George M. Miller and they had at least seven children. George was born 1 March 1840 and died 23 Nov 1912. George’s parents are Frederick Hardin Miller and Persia Lucy Roberts.

3. William Alvin Latham was born in 1848 in Shelby County, Texas and died in 1872. He married Cynthia Caroline Brittain and they had two children. Then Cynthia married James Allen Payne and they had four or five children – the 5th might possibly be the child some believe was born to Mildred Ann Latham and James Allen Payne. Cynthia’s parents are Williams Martin Brittain and Elizabeth Ann Haley.

Posted in Latham

Two steps forward, ten steps back or family lore strikes (out) again…

Family research rarely goes smoothly. You learn this the very first day you begin this adventure. But there are days that seem like nonstop road blocks and brick walls. I recently had an entire month of those.

It began with what seemed like the perfect lead to that ever illusive Native American heritage. I went through hundreds, maybe thousands, of files. Found many new and interesting details. As it turned out though all I had was a collateral relative who thought family lore was actual proof of NA heritage. It appears he thought simply submitting an application based on this family lore would get the family entry into The Cherokee Tribe. Needless to say this did not happen. And yet the family is still insistent they have, we have, Native American heritage.

During this process I ran across another researcher with iron clad proof of NA heritage. They are absolutely certain their 3great-grandpapa is full blooded NA, or at least half. The really good part is they found official documentation to his parents. He’s named in his father’s will and everything. The 3great-grandpapa’s father was born in Ireland. They found his father (their 4great-grandpapa) on a specific passenger list on a specific ship. And they know where this ship docked and the 4great-grandpapa’s father’s migration route south. So, now they are down to half NA.

This researcher and their family also know who and where this 4great-grandpapa met and married their 4great-grandmama. They know her parents names and heritage. And when they came here, from England. This 4great-grandmama was born in Virginia a few months after their arrival.

But still they are absolutely certain their 3great-grandpapa is full blooded Native American. Or maybe half. Their proof? Family lore!

Posted in Uncategorized