It really is like a box of chocolates…

I love this video. It is one of the reasons why I finally did my Ancestry DNA test. One of the many reasons why I think everyone should have their DNA tested.

 

I absolutely love all the Ancestry.com DNA ads. Now my most favorite is where the lady says I thought I married an Italian.

Bobby and I could do this ad with him stating I thought I married a little Irish girl. With the maiden surname of O’Quinn, what else would he think?

My Grandpapa Sidney Edward O’Quinn married a little Irish girl too. Grandmama was a Kennedy and her momma was a Riley. Lots of Irish heritage. Of course, I expected lots of Irish DNA.

 

O'Quinn.coa

“I would see what is above”

Even so no matter where we were stationed I was most always mistaken for Asian (far east not central or south). Possibly because of my size and bone structure.

In all these many hours and years of research I have never found a family connection to any Far East Asian country.

Not even a trace of Asian DNA was found! Asian DNA was supposed to be the surprise that showed up. Instead my big surprise was very little Irish DNA.

So, I guess you could say my Ethnicity was not exactly what I expected.

I am:

58% Europe West. That covers Belgium, France and Germany. In my case, at least in part, possibly because of my Great-grandmama Mary Josephine Holt Latham. Her ancestors were German and even go back to Prussia. One of my cousins has a wonderful old portrait of Mary Josephine. You can easily see the German heritage in her face.

16% Scandinavia. This covers Sweden, Norway and Denmark. Maybe this is where I get my fair skin. I always thought that was thanks to all my Irish DNA…

12% Ireland. This one is easy. My 5great-grandpapa Alexander Bryant O’Quinn was born in County Clare. And his ancestors had been in Ireland forever.

7% Great Brittain. This covers England, Scotland and Wales. This will possibly be in part from my Elder William Brittain and Rosanna Wright families.

6% Iberian Peninsula. This covers Spain and Portugal. This one also seems easy. My 4great-grandmama Maria de la Concepcion Perez. Her family goes back many generations in Spain and the Canary Islands.

1% Native American. This covers, North, South and Central America. Even though family lore states/insists it is there, I have yet to find any Native American heritage in my way too many years to admit to research. In other words – I got nothing.

Happy St Patrick’s Day, everyone!!

                                   shamrock border.1

Posted in Brittain, Holt, O'Quinn, Perez, Wright

The Rick Bragg connection…

Ava's Man

Charlie Franklin Bundrum is the son of James J. Bundrum and Martha S. Mixon. He is the grandson of James B. Bundrum and Mary Butts.

Charlie Franklin Bundrum was born 28 Apr 1906 in Alabama. He died 7 Apr 1958 in Calhoun County, Alabama. He married Ava Mae Hamilton in Jan 1924 in Etowah County, Alabama. Ava is the daughter of William Hamilton and Mary Presley. She was born 14 Jun 1907 in Etowah County, Alabama and died 22 Nov 1994 in Calhoun County, Alabama.

Charlie was a carpenter. Ava was a housewife.

        Children of Charlie and Ava:

  1. James Franklin Bundrum was born 2 Mar 1925 in Chattooga County, Georgia. He married Christphine Taylor 11 Jul 1946 in Calhoun County, Alabama. She was born 3 Aug 1924 in Alabama.
  2. William Albert Bundrum was born 6 Jun 1926 in Chattooga County, Georgia. He married Mary Louise Reaves 14 Aug 1946 in Dade County, Georgia. Mary Louise was born 22 Jan 1931 in Alabama. She died 12 Sept 2003 in Shelby County, Alabama.
  3. Edna Inez Bundrum was born 30 Sept 1929 in Alabama. She died 4 Jul 2009 in Etowah County, Alabama. She married Charles Hugh Sanders. He was born 16 Nov 1925 and died 23 Jan 1978.
  4. Emma Mae Bundrum was born 29 May 1932 in Floyd County, Georgia. She died 17 Apr 1933 in Floyd County, Georgia.
  5. Gracie Juanita Bundrum was born 22 Apr 1934.
  6. Margaret Marie Bundrum was born 23 Apr 1937 in Fulton County, Georgia. She married Charles Bragg.

http://www.randomhouse.com/knopf/authors/bragg/

  1. Mary Jo Bundrum was born 27 Mar 1941.
  2. Betty Sue Bundrum was born 30 Mar 1944 in Calhoun County, Alabama. She died 19 Jun 1983 in Calhoun County, Alabama. She married James Nolan Green. He was born about 1950 and died 30 May 1990.
Posted in Bondurant/Bundrum | 1 Comment

James B. Bundrum wives and children…

James B. Bundrum was born 3 May 1826 in Walton County, Georgia. He died 25 Mar 1913 in Etowah County, Alabama. James and Mary Butts married about 1858 in Paulding County, Georgia. Mary was born about 1839 in Georgia. She died 30 Oct 1887 in Paulding County, Georgia.

JamesBundrum

James B. Bundrum

James and Mary had the following children:

1. John Lewis Bundrum was born 25 Dec 1859 in Georgia. He died 9 Mar 1948 in Lincoln County, Arkansas. He married Emma Beasley 15 Aug 1891 in Alcorn County, Mississippi. She was born in Jan 1864. She died after 1895.

2. William Jacob Bundrum was born 28 Oct 1862 in Paulding County, Georgia. He died 26 Feb 1908 in Paulding County, Georgia. He married Canzada Ann Sinyard, daughter of Simpson Sinyard and Sarah Ann Whitlow, 12 Dec 1886 in Paulding County, Georgia. She was born in Aug 1866 in Paulding County, Georgia.

3. James J. Bundrum was born 12 Mar 1865 in Paulding County, Georgia. He died 15 Feb 1927 in Chattooga County, Georgia. He married (1) Ruthie J. Jarvis, daughter of J.B. Jarvis, about 1923 in Alabama or Georgia. She was born about 1905 in Quitman County, Georgia. She died 15 Jun 1924 in Chattooga County, Georgia. He married (2) Martha S. Mixon, daughter of Louis John Mixon and Margaret Ann Weldon, 19 Apr 1885 in Paulding County, Georgia. She was born 11 Apr 1867 in Georgia. She died 19 Apr 1921 in Etowah County, Alabama. He married (3) Dolly Teems about 1926 in Alabama or Georgia.

4. Andrew David Bundrum was born in Feb 1868 in Paulding County, Georgia. He died 27 May 1946 in Calhoun County, Alabama. He married Ersula Adeline Cole 14 May 1888 in Paulding County, Georgia. She was born in Sep 1869 in Georgia. She died 7 Apr 1940 in Calhoun County, Alabama.

5. Sarah Alice Bundrum was born in Feb 1869 in Paulding County, Georgia. She died 15 Dec 1944 in Haralson County, Georgia. She married John Franklin Mixon about 1888. He was born 14 Jun 1871 in Georgia. He died 24 Aug 1943 in Georgia.

6. Martha Bundrum was born 10 Sep 1872 in Paulding County, Georgia. She died 6 Oct 1954 in De Kalb County, Alabama. She married A.J. Bachelor 29 Aug 1889 in Haralson County, Georgia. He was born 10 Oct 1859.

7. Louvade Bundrum was born 24 Oct 1874 in Paulding County, Georgia. She died 12 Mar 1953 in Calhoun County, Alabama. She married John W. Thompson, son of Ransom Ashberry Thompson, 13 Mar 1890 in Cleburne County, Alabama. He was born about 1871. He died after 1910.

Lou and John

John W. Thompson and Louvade Bundrum

8. Adeline Eugenia Bundrum was born 16 Jun 1877 in Paulding County, Georgia. She died 22 Feb 1961 in Jefferson County, Alabama. She married Samuel Alonzo Wicks, son of Isaac Wix II and Melinda Cole, 24 Nov 1895 in Haralson County, Georgia. He was born 8 Oct 1875 in Georgia. He died 7 Sep 1941 in Jefferson County, Alabama.

GrandmaAddie

Adeline Eugenia Bundrum

9. Thomas Jefferson Bundrum was born 25 Mar 1881 in Paulding County, Georgia. He died 5 Apr 1959 in Cobb County, Georgia. He married Burma L. Maddex about 1902. She was born in 1887. She died 1 Oct 1967 in Cobb County, Georgia.

                                               *******

James B. Bundrum married Sarah Ford 20 Jan 1888 in Cleburne County, Georgia. Sarah was born in Oct 1867 and died in 1893.

James and Sarah had the following children:

10. Monroe W. Bundrum was born 15 Mar 1889 in Cleburne County, Alabama. He died 23 Sep 1912 in Etowah County, Alabama.

James B Bundrum and son Monroe

James B. Bundrum and son Monroe, ca 1912

11. Richard David Bundrum was born 14 Feb 1892 in Cleburne County, Alabama. He died 21 Jan 1965 in Florida. He married Annie Pearl Fowler 26 Mar 1922. She was born 20 Jan 1905. She died 26 Jan 2005.

                                               *******

James B. Bundrum married Nancy J. Thompson 8 Jan 1894 in Cleburne County, Georgia. Nancy was born in 1867 and died 19 Apr 1921 in Etowah County, Alabama. Nancy is the sister of James’ son-in-law John Wesley Thompson – married to daughter Louvade. James and Nancy do not appear to have had any children.

Posted in Bondurant/Bundrum, Wicks | 1 Comment

President Washington connection link…

http://www.countygenweb.com/txshelby/brittain_william.htm

Posted in Brittain, Wright

Sources…

I should have been telling everyone here, as I do with one on one contact, one newly found document can change everything. A new collaboration can change everything. New understanding of a document found years ago can change everything.

Now for all the people who requested all my sources on my Latham/Pilgrim connection: My sources back to John Latham and Mary Susan Andrews are the usual and easy sources. Family Bibles. Marriage records. Birth records. Death records. Cemetery records. Census records. Church records. Property/land documents. Tax records. Military records. Pension records. Will/estate divisions. Probate and other court documents.

I connect this John Latham to John Latham and Susannah Henderson and then on back to James Chilton with the much appreciated help of a Cornelius Latham descendent in possession of a Family Bible filled with many treasures of info. Plus, all the usual and easy sources.

Could all this change? Absolutely! Well, at least the part that connects me to John Latham and Susannah Henderson and on back. If/when that happens I will simply edit this post. Not like I haven’t done that before!

Posted in Latham

My Connection to President/General George Washington…

Starting with my Grandmother:
Annie Elizabeth Lane Brittain was born 6 August 1892 In Shelby County Texas. She married William Pearl Latham 16 October 1910 In Shelby County. Annie and Pearl had five children. They divorced in 1944. Pearl remarried almost immediately. Annie never did. According to Annie she was named for her Grandmother Elizabeth Ann Haley and Colonel Walter P. Lane. Annie’s father, Thomas Franklin Brittain served in Lane’s Calvary under Colonel Lane. Annie died 1 May 1982, still in Shelby County. I miss her every day.

Annie

Annie Elizabeth Lane Brittain – on her wedding day in wedding dress she made

Great-grandfather:
Thomas Franklin Brittain was born 14 December 1843. He died 30 October 1922. Thomas was a farmer and a well-respected lifelong resident Of Shelby County. Sadly, Thomas buried three wives. He and first wife Willie V. Biggs married about 1863. They had at least six children. Family lore states Willie died shortly after their youngest was born in 1878. By 1880 Thomas had married Sarah Addie Biggs, younger sister of Willie. Thomas and Sarah had at least 5 children, including my Grandmama Annie. Sarah Addie died in February 1901. On 25 November 1901 Thomas married Marilla Taylor a thirty years’ younger widow. Marilla already had at least one child; she and Thomas did not have more children. Marilla died 24 February 1922.

River Tom

Thomas Franklin Brittain

2Great-grandfather:
Williams Martin Brittain was born in 1812 in Surry County North Carolina. Williams arrived in Shelby County Texas 18 January 1837. On 3 August 1838 he was approved for a Class 2 Land Certificate for 640 acres in Shelby County. Williams given name is his Grandmother’s maiden name, a tradition in his Mother’s family. He married Elizabeth Ann Haley in 1842. They had at least ten children. Plus, they took in Elizabeth’s two youngest brothers after her parents passed. Williams died 13 March 1889. Elizabeth died 2 February 1901.

3Great-grandmother:
Rosanna Wright was born in 1782 in Surry County North Carolina. On 15 May 1802 in Surry County she married William Martin Brittain. Rosanna and Elder William (along with their married children, their grandchildren, some of Rosanna’s siblings, cousins and others) left Surry County headed for Texas. By 1824 they were in Madison County Alabama. By September 1827 they were in Pulaski County Arkansas. Almost ten years later they arrived in Shelby County Texas, on 18 January 1837. Rosanna and Elder William along with six sons, three daughters, three sons-in-law, two daughters-in-law and several grandchildren crossed the Sabine River on the John Latham Ferry. Rosanna and Elder William had at least nine children. Rosanna died 29 October 1856. Elder William on 16 September 1850.

Rosanna Wright

Rosanna Wright

4Great-grandfather:
Captain John Wright III was born 30 October 1731 in Fauquier County Virginia. John served in the Revolutionary War. As a boy he was acquainted with John Marshall, the 4
th Chief Justice. John married Ann Williams in 1753 in Virginia. They had at least eighteen children. After John passed Ann remarried and had at least two more children. John died 29 October 1789 in Surry County North Carolina. John left Rosanna 160 acres in his Will.

5Great-grandfather:
Captain John Wright II was born about 1707 in Westmoreland County Virginia. John was a Gentleman Farmer, Vestryman, County Officer, Lawyer and Judge. His title of Captain is from his training and service in the Virginia Militia. John married Elizabeth Bronough, a widow, about 1730. They had at least six children. John died 27 February 1792 In Fauquier County Virginia. At this point John had lived longer than any of his Wright ancestors. He saw the reign of three kings, one queen and a president. He was proud of his English heritage. But also extremely proud that he had lived to see his second cousin become the first president of the first true republic in the entire world.  

6Great-grandfather:
John Wright I was born 25 February 1685 in Westmoreland County Virginia. The Wright family can trace their ancestry back to the Barons who met with King John in 1215 to sign the Magna Carta. John was a Lawyer, Surveyor, Vestryman, Sheriff’s Deputy and Judge. He was also a Gentleman Farmer, although he was said to be a better sportsman than farmer. John married Dorothy Aubrey in 1706 in Westmoreland County. It is believed they had only two children. John died 28 May 1738 in Prince William County Virginia.

7Great-grandmother:
Anne Pope Washington was born in September 1660 in Westmoreland County Virginia. Anne married Major Francis Wright in 1682 in Richmond County Virginia. They had only two children. Anne died very young, on 11 March 1697. Her surviving husband and children were named in the Will of her brother Captain Lawrence Washington.

Captain Lawrence Washington is the Grandfather of President George Washington. His son Captain Augustine Washington is the father of President George Washington.

Which makes President George Washington my 2nd cousin 7 times removed!

president washington.1

President George Washington

Posted in Brittain, Wright

I have 1940 Census info overload…

It’s all good though. I finally found Leona!

The Census are an amazing source of information. With a little luck and a lot of long hours you can follow your ancestry through every available Census.

Through the Census we find where long ago grandparents immigrated from. How many pregnancies a grandmother had, and how many of those children were living. You might even find a distant aunt was married and had her first child by the time she was fifteen.

Though the Census we often find young siblings being raised by an older and married sibling. Because their parents had died much too young.

Through following the Census we easily see many people, in every state, married to cousins.

Through the Census we see that neighbors packed up together and went looking for a better life. Such long journeys, that took years to complete.

Through the Census we see so many occupations. Many were farmers. They’d work 60, 70 and 80 hours a week. And brought their children up to work the farm with them.

But sometimes they were merchants. Maybe tie makers. Waitresses and cooks. Preachers who headed west and helped establish Churches along the way. Door to door salesmen. Carpenters and painters. Coal miners and oil field workers. Truck drivers for state highway departments. Medical professionals. The list is endless.

Through the Census we find ancestors who served in the Military. Patriots answering the call to duty. Sometimes never making it back home. Dying on the battlefield. Or dying because diseases we’ve only read about spread like wildfire through the primitive military camps.

Through the Census we learn who could read and write. What grade level of school they completed.

Through the Census we learn how much property was owned or rented. The value of their owned property.

So much information to be found.

Leona and Blackie circa 1940

Leona and Blackie circa 1940

And through the 1940 Census I finally found Leona.

Mary Leona McIntosh was born 8 December 1916 and died 22 July 1993. The daughter of Ed McIntosh and Virdie Veller Fancher. Leona is buried in Gann Cemetery at the O’Quinn Baptist Church in Angelina County, Texas.

Leona is the first wife of my Daddy – Ottis Brittain O’Quinn (Blackie). I found Blackie and Leona living with her step-father Otis Bartel Reed, her mother and younger sister in Angelina County. Leona was working as a waitress. Blackie as a truck driver in the road building industry. Leona completed 10th grade. Blackie completed 7th grade.

At this point in time I do not appear to have any more siblings…

Posted in O'Quinn

Nathaniel Green Brandon and Julia Ann Flanagan

Nathaniel Green Brandon, son of William D. Brandon and Susan Latham, was born on 31 January 1847 in Shelby County, Texas. He died on 27 August 1925. He married Julia Ann Flanagan, daughter of Robert Montgomery Flanagan and Matilda Clara Watkins, on 12 November 1873 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. She was born on 22 February 1859 in Sabine Parish. She died on 28 January 1925.

Nathaniel and Julia are both buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Nathaniel served in the Army of the Confederate States of America: Company G, Col Bradford’s Brigade, Texas Infantry. Enlisted in 1864, discharged at Tyler Texas, CSA pension #26853.

They are identified in the CONFEDERATE INDIGENT FAMILIES LIST 1863-1865 for Sabine Parish.

Nathaniel and Julia are found on the 1880 Sabine Louisiana Census with two children.

They are found on the 1900 Nacogdoches Texas Census with eight children.

They are found on the 1910 Nacogdoches Texas Census with three children.

They are found on the 1920 Nacogdoches Texas Census, Nathaniel age 72 and Julia age 63. No more children at home.

Nathaniel Green Brandon  and  Julia Ann Flanagan

Nathaniel Green Brandon and
Julia Ann Flanagan

 Their Children:

  1. Carl Neville Brandon was born 1 February 1873 in Louisiana. He died on 23 June 1943 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. He married Agerine Taylor, daughter of George Taylor, 20 December 1894 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. She was born 17 August 1874 in Louisiana. She died on 24 November 1948 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. She was born 19 October 1916. She died 24 August 1957. Carl Neville and Rena appear to have ten children.

Carl and Rena are both buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Carl and Rena are found on the 1910 Shelby Texas Census with six children.

They are found on the 1920 Nacogdoches Texas Census with nine children.

They are found on the 1930 Nacogdoches Texas Census with four children.

They are found on the 1940 Nacogdoches Texas Census, just the two of them.

                      

Carl Neville Brandon and Agerine Taylor

Carl Neville Brandon and
Agerine Taylor

 

  1. Zoda Lee Brandon was born 2 November 1878 in Shelby County, Texas. She died 19 August 1932 in Sabine County, Texas. She married 1st John C. Cain on 1 January 1896 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. He was born 12 December 1870 in Louisiana. He died 13 February 1919 in Sabine Parish. She married 2nd Frank James Pylant about 1920. He was born 1 December 1865 in Pike County, Alabama. He died 17 July 1943 in Sabine County, Texas. Zoda Lee and John Cain appear to have seven children.

Zoda is buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

1st husband John C. Cain is buried in Fenders Cemetery, Sabine Parish, Louisiana.

2nd husband Frank James Pylant is buried in Brookeland Cemetery, Sabine County, Texas.

Zoda and John are found on the 1900 Sabine Louisiana Census with two daughters.

Zoda and Frank are found on the 1920 Sabine Texas Census with Zoda and John’s three youngest children.

They are found on the 1930 Sabine Texas Census with Zoda and John’s two youngest children.

Frank is found on the 1940 Sabine Texas Census with son-in-law Troy Downs and daughter (step-daughter) Etta.

Zoda Lee Brandon

Zoda Lee Brandon

 

  1. James Wheeler Brandon was born 10 January 1881. He died 19 November 1910. He married Addie Stubblefield, daughter of Sam S. Stubblefield and Keziah Melton, on 28 February 1900 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. She was born 24 April 1878 in Texas. She died 29 May 1963 in Nacogdoches County. Wheeler and Addie appear to have had at least four children.

Wheeler and Addie are both buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Wheeler and Addie are found on the 1900 Nacogdoches Texas Census.

Addie married James Luther Wells 10 September 1911 in Nacogdoches County. They appear to have had at least four children together.

Addie and Luther are found on the 1920 Nacogdoches Texas Census with their four children, Addie and Wheeler’s four and Luther’s oldest son from a previous marriage.

Addie and Luther are found on the 1930 Nacogdoches Texas Census. They are shown with two daughters, one son and Addie and Wheeler’s daughter.

James Wheeler Brandon and Addie Stubblefield

James Wheeler Brandon and
Addie Stubblefield

 

  1. Nathaniel Webster Brandon was born 24 May 1883 in Sabine County, Texas. He died 1 December 1959 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. He married Mattie Frances Blackwell, daughter of John Blackwell and Elizabeth Owens, on 14 January 1903 in Sabine County, Texas. She was born 27 April 1888 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. She died 30 April 1967 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. Webb and Mattie appear to have had at least thirteen children, including one set of twins.

Webb and Mattie are both buried in Zwolle Cemetery, Sabine Parish, Louisiana.

Webb and Mattie are found on the 1910 Sabine Louisiana Census with four children.

They are found on the 1920 Sabine Louisiana Census with eight children.

They are found on the 1930 Sabine Louisiana Census with nine children.

The 1940 Sabine Louisiana Census shows Mrs NW Brandon as head of household. Mattie is shown with six children.

Nathaniel Webster   Brandon

Nathaniel Webster Brandon

Mattie Francis Blackwell

Mattie Francis Blackwell

 5.  John Lee Brandon was born 18 June 1885 in Texas. He died 11 June 1928 in Sabine County, Texas. On 28 October 1907 John Lee married Mattie Lee Click. She was born 19 February 1892 in Sabine County, Texas. She died 21 February 1979 in Trinity County, Texas. John and Mattie had at least two children.

John is buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Mattie is buried in Glenwood Cemetery, Trinity County, Texas.

John and Mattie are found on the 1920 Natchitoches Louisiana Census with their daughter and Mattie’s sister.

Mattie and her son are found on the 1930 Sabine Texas Census with Mattie’s brother Joseph C. Click.

On 28 September 1930 Mattie married Andrew King Avery.

King and Mattie are found on the 1940 Nacogdoches Texas Census with three children – his son, her son and their son.

Mattie Lee Click, Lottie Lee Brandon and John Lee Brandon

Mattie Lee Click, Lottie Lee Brandon and
John Lee Brandon

 

  1. William Mitchell Brandon was born 18 July 1887 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. He died 9 November 1943 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. He married Margaret Scogin 21 November 1909 in Nacogdoches County. She was born 6 October 1885 in Nacogdoches County. She died 5 May 1958 in Rusk County, Texas. William and Margaret appear to have had at least three children.

Will and Margaret are both buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Will and Margaret are found on the 1910 Nacogdoches Texas Census.

They are found on the 1920 Nacogdoches Texas Census with three children.

They are found on the 1930 Nacogdoches Texas Census with three children.

William Mitchell Brandon and Margaret Scogin

William Mitchell Brandon and Margaret Scogin

 

  1. Bertis Talmadge Brandon was born 5 October 1889 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. He died 1 January 1941 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. He married Lillie Pace. She was born 13 October 1889 in Jasper County, Texas. She died 13 January 1962 in Angelina County, Texas. Bertis and Lillie appear to have had at least eight children.

Bertis and Lillie are both buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Bertis and Lillie are found on the 1910 Nacogdoches Texas Census.

They are found on the 1920 Jasper Texas Census with three children.

They are found on the 1930 Nacogdoches Texas Census with six children.

They are found on the 1940 Nacogdoches Texas Census with four children.

Bertis Talmadge Brandon and Lillie Pace

Bertis Talmadge Brandon and Lillie Pace

 

  1. Marguritte Elizabeth Brandon was born 23 July 1892 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. She died 7 September 1969 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. She married Elisha Nolen Muckleroy, son of David Henry Muckleroy and Alice Virginia Myatt, on 30 June 1917 in Nacogdoches County. He was born 26 July 1893 in Nacogdoches County. He died 10 November 1980 in Nacogdoches County. Maggie and Nolan had at least one child.

Maggie and Nolen are buried in Fairview Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Maggie and Nolen are found on the 1930 Nacogdoches Texas Census with one child.

They are found on the 1940 Nacogdoches Texas Census with the same son and Nolen’s widowed father.

Marguritte Elizabeth Brandon  and Elisha Nolen Muckleroy

Marguritte Elizabeth Brandon
and
Elisha Nolen Muckleroy

 

  1. Robert Montgomery Brandon was born 5 March 1893 in Louisiana. He died 9 June 1944 in Harris County, Texas. He married Mary Ethel Mills on 27 December 1913 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. She was born 5 February 1893 in Franklin County, Texas. She died 1 January 1972 in Harris County, Texas. Robert and Mary had at least three children.

Robert is buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Mary is buried in Cedar Crest Cemetery, Harris County, Texas.

Robert and Mary are found on the 1920 Angelina Texas Census with two children.

They are found on the 1930 Liberty Texas Census with three children.

They are found on the 1940 Harris Texas Census with one child.

Robert Montgomery Brandon and  Mary Ethel Mills

Robert Montgomery Brandon and
Mary Ethel Mills

 

  1. Hoyt Brandon was born 30 July 1897 in Sabine Parish, Louisiana. He died 4 November 1967 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. He married Rosa Lavender, daughter of William Uria Lavender and 1st wife Georgia Ann Watt, on 7 August 1920 in Nacogdoches County. She was born 18 October 1903 in Sumter County, Alabama. She died 6 May 1993 in Nacogdoches County. Hoyt and Rosa had four children.

Hoyt and Rosa are both buried in Bethel Cemetery, Nacogdoches County, Texas.

Hoyt and Rosa are found on the 1930 Nacogdoches Texas Census with three children.

They are found on the 1940 Nacogdoches Texas Census with three children.

Hoyt and Hoy are twins.

Hoyt Brandon and Rosa Lavender

Hoyt Brandon and Rosa Lavender

  1. Hoy L Brandon was born 30 July 1897 in Louisiana. He died 11 November 1964 in Nueces County, Texas. He married Allie Axley. She was born 11 July 1884. She died 18 May 1970. Hoy and Allie had at least one child.

Hoy and Allie are both buried in Rose Hill Memorial Park, Nueces County, Texas.

Hoy and Allie are found on the 1920 Nacogdoches Texas Census.

They are found on the 1930 Nacogdoches Texas Census with one child.

They are found on the 1940 Nacogdoches Texas Census with one child and Allie’s mother.

Hoy (left) and Hoyt (right) Brandon

Hoy (left) and Hoyt (right) Brandon

 

  1. Emma Brandon was born 7 August 1901. She died 26 September 1902 in Nacogdoches County, Texas.
Posted in Latham

Susan Latham and William Brandon

Susan Latham was born in 1821 in Shelby Texas to John Latham and Marquerita Rosalie Sims. Susan is found on the 1835 Census of Tenahaw as the 14 year old daughter of John Lathan. It appears she married William D. Brandon shortly after that census was taken. Their first child was born in September 1835.

William and Susan and six of their children are found on the 1850 Newton Texas Census.

Susan is found on the 1880 Shelby Texas Census as the mother-in-law of AJ Windham.

William D. Brandon was born in 1811 in Tennessee. He died in 1859 in Newton Texas.

Their Children:

1.  John Brandon was born 11 Sept 1835. He died 10 Apr 1905. John married De Blancha Lamberth, daughter of Elisha A. Lamberth and Nancy Anderson, 9 February 1876 in Sabine Texas. She was born 23 September 1849. She died 2 April 1904. They appear to have had at least five children.

John and De Blancha are found on the 1880 Sabine Texas Census with two children.

They are found on the 1900 Sabine Texas Census, with three sons and a female boarder.

John Brandon  1835 - 1905

John Brandon
1835 – 1905

 2.  William M. Brandon was born about 1839.

3.  James Brandon was born about 1841.

4.  King Brandon was born about 1843.

5.  Nathaniel Green Brandon was born 31 January 1847 in Shelby Texas. He died 27 August 1925. He married Julia Ann Flanagan, daughter of Robert Montgomery Flanagan and Matilda Watkins, 12 November 1873 in Sabine Louisiana. Julia was born 22 February 1859 in Sabine Parish. She died in 28 January 1925. They appear to have had thirteen children, including one set of twin boys.

Nathaniel and Julia are found on the 1880 Sabine Louisiana Census, with two children.

They are found on the 1900 Nacogdoches Texas Census, with eight children.

They are found on the 1910 Nacogdoches Texas Census, with three children.

They are found on the 1920 Nacogdoches Texas Census, just the two of them.

Nathaniel Green Brandon  and  Julia Ann Flanagan

Nathaniel Green Brandon and
Julia Ann Flanagan

6.  Rebecca Brandon was born about 1849.

7.  Mary Jane Brandon was born about 1852. She married Alfred H. Reese. He was born about 1831 in Georgia, the son of Henry Littleton Reese. They appear to have had at least six children.

Alfred and Mary Jane are found on the 1880 Jasper Texas Census, with six children and Mary Jane’s sister Elizabeth Brandon.

8.  Elizabeth Brandon was born 4 October 1855 in Newton Texas. She died 14 September 1936 in Liberty Texas. She married Samuel Squier on 21 October 1880 in Jasper Texas. Samuel was born 14 Jul 1852 in Covington Alabama to Elijah Squier and Mary Thompkins. He died 22 Dec 1941 in San Jacinto Texas. Both are buried in Magnolia Cemetery, San Jacinto County Texas. Elizabeth and Samuel had at least seven children.

Elizabeth and Samuel are found on the 1900 Liberty Texas Census, with six children.

They are found on the 1920 Liberty Texas Census, just the two of them.

9.  Josephine Brandon was born 25 December 1859 in Newton Texas. She died 7 October 1906 in Shelby Texas. She married Benjamin Franklin Windham, son of Jackson Houston Windham and Mary Allen, about 1879. He was born 16 March 1861 in Mississippi. He died 10 March 1934 in Shelby Texas. Josephine is buried in East Hamilton Cemetery and Benjamin in Strong Cemetery; both located in Shelby Texas. They appear to have had at least five children. After Josephine passed, Benjamin married twice more. He and 3rd wife Addie Shull appear to have had at least three children.

Josephine and Benjamin are found on the 1880 Shelby Texas Census, with one daughter.

They are found on the 1900 Shelby Texas Census, with five children.

Benjamin and 2nd wife Charlotte are found on the 1910 Shelby Texas Census, with three children. Ben and Josephine’s two youngest sons and Charlotte’s daughter.

Benjamin and 3rd wife Addie Shull are found on the 1920 Shelby Texas Census, with three sons. Ben and Josephine’s youngest son plus Ben and Addie’s two.

Posted in Latham | 2 Comments

THE POISONED WEDDING SUPPER

THE POISONED WEDDING SUPPER

Niles Register, May 22, 1847:

At a wedding of an orphan girl raised by a Mr. Wilkinson in the community of East Hamilton in Shelby County, sixty of the guests were poisoned, ten or twelve of whom have already died, and thirty, Dr. Sharp was of the opinion, would not survive.

The Regulator-Moderator War was coming to an end in Shelby County. Just when you would think it was over, a little spark would break out anew. In the spring of 1847 there were still some hard feelings between Shelby County families involved in the feud, including some individuals who lived at Hamilton, a community established in the spring of 1828 by Alexander Hamilton and his wife Mary.

The Hamilton’s, who lived in Perry County, Alabama, decided to load their household effects on a horse-drawn cart, hitch a milk cow to the cart and head west. They crossed the Red River at Grand Ecore, four miles north of Natchitoches, passed through what is now Zwolle, and came to the swollen Sabine River. Crossing the river on a raft built of logs fastened together with vines, they built a small log house on the river’s west bank and decided the site would make a good trading post. He called his store Hamilton Trading Post. The name of the community was later changed to East Hamilton, since it was understood that there was another Hamilton in Texas.

Other settlers soon joined Hamilton in the settlement, including Elder William Brittain, a Baptist preacher and cotton buyer, who called the Sabine River bottomlands “the law-less, no-man’s land of Texas.” Brittain arrived in 1837 to found, in his home, one of the first Baptist churches in Texas, along with a cemetery. A school followed in 1838.

One of the worst catastrophes in this little community was the Wilkinson wedding supper. The wedding supper, a common event in small communities of the 1840’s was to honor a young couple following their marriage ceremony. The folks at East Hamilton were ready for a pleasant celebration. All up and down the Sabine River news was: “Old man Wilkinson’s daughter was finally getting married.” The groom, Morris, was not much of a catch, and everyone thought he would fit right in with his new in-laws, or rather outlaws. Old man Wilkinson was a bad character himself, and a notorious hog thief.

All around the community, the ladies were trying on dancing shoes and pulling out dresses they had not worn for years. Excitement was in the air. The date was April 22, 1847. The groom wanted to wait for a June wedding, but Wilkinson insisted on an early marriage – something could happen, you know, and Morris could get away.

Mrs. Edens, the woman Wilkinson hired to bake the cakes, had left them in the smokehouse for safekeeping. She went early the next morning to see if the cakes were all right. She noticed that the icing had been removed on all but one, and that one was covered with custard. The others were dark and discolored. She tried to make them look a little better by grating some loafsugar over them. After all, she didn’t have time to bake more.

The Spottswood Sanders family, a neighbor of Wilkinson, did not really want to go as there had been trouble between the families. Wilkinson has been accused of stealing Sanders’ hogs. And, too, Wilkinson was a Moderator and Sanders was a Regulator. But, they thought that if they did not go, the talk would be that the feud was still going.

At the last moment, the Sanders family decided not to attend the wedding. When Wilkinson heard that the Sanders family was not coming, he packed up some of the wedding supper that had been prepared and sent it to them. Among the assortment was a half of a shoat, one turkey, three chickens, chicken pie, and butter pound cakes – enough to feed all, even their Negro folks, for a week. What a feast! They thought, “Old Wilkinson ain’t all bad!” They all sat down and ate. All of the food was poisoned, even the butter which was elegantly molded. The meal resulted in the death of Mrs. Susan Eliza Sanders, wife of Spottswood Henry Sanders, and two of her sons, Robert Henry, age 5, and Edward Hamilton, age 3. As Mrs. Sanders was dying, she asked that her children be reared in the nurture of the Lord. She did not know they were already dead or dying. She also asked that her Negro servants come and bid her farewell; but they couldn’t, they were poisoned too. Spottswood and his son Francis survived after they crawled to a slop bucket, drank from it and vomited.

Meanwhile, back at the party, everyone was eating finger foods. That is, everyone but the Wilkinsons. The food was laced with arsenic. It did not take long for the poison to start killing. Some dropped dead on the spot, others took longer.

Allen Haley and his mother were apparently the only persons at the wedding who were not poisoned. The Haleys arrived late, after the other guests had been served, and ate some of the same food, but not the cake. Wilkinson supposedly cut a fresh cake for them, but they declined to eat, saving their lives. The Haley’s lost a Negro slave, whose wife was one of the servants attending the wedding. She carried him a piece of the pound cake. He ate two mouthfuls and not liking the taste, ate no more. Yet, that killed him.

Mrs. Edens, who made the cakes, was poisoned along with her son and a Negro girl. The girl died and her son was not expected to recover. The poisoned butter left at the wedding was thrown out. Birds supposedly ate the butter and died within a few minutes.

Elder William Brittain, who may have officiated at the wedding, entered the names of several members of his own family on the death pages of his family Bible. There are five Brittain graves in the East Hamilton Cemetery with names but no death dates. They are: Thomas, R. J., Mary, Martha, and Bobbie. The Brittain family Bible has been lost, and we may never know if these children died at the supper.

Two Castleberrys, one of the Daughters and his wife, died. One of the bridesmaids died, and yet strange to tell, neither the bride or any of the Wilkinson family were injured.

Whatever happened, guests at the supper are said to have screamed, blown horns and induced their hounds to howl. In those days a sound created by blowing a cow’s horn was a universal distress signal.

Dr. James H. Starr of Nacogdoches writes that seventeen of the fifty-four who were poisoned have died, and fifteen others are considered dangerously ill. His statement was printed in the Niles Register on June 5, 1847.

On July 19, 1847, an article in the Telegraph and Register states: “Wilkinson, at whose house the wedding was held, has confessed that he had the arsenic purposely mixed in the cakes….” The article also confirmed that the bride was an orphan girl raised by Wilkinson.

On May 23, 1847, a letter written in Bayou Sara. Louisiana to a friend contained the particulars of the incident. The letter said that “Old Wilkinson and his wife, and Morris’ wife were arrested and examined before Squire Sanders, who committed them to prison.” Wilkinson was brought before a magistrate and released. He was afraid to leave the house during the day, as there were persons determined to kill him. During the night Wilkinson supposedly escaped on a horse brought to him by Morris. Eight men rode off in pursuit of him with intentions to kill him on sight. In an account printed in the Telegraph and Register in 1847 states what Wilkinson was captured and hung. It is said that he confessed that he had given the arsenic to the cook to be mixed in the cake, and that he cautioned the bride and other members of the family not to eat the cake.

With the passage of a century and a half years, the poisoned wedding supper has evolved into a folk tale throughout East Texas. Various accounts and a retelling of the story have confused what really happened, or the number of people who actually died. In the East Hamilton Cemetery, a series of old, unmarked gravestones – deceased’s names erased by the ravages of time – lend some credibility to the tragic, unthinkable incident.

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